Advocacy & Legal

Advocacy

 

Statehouse Report

The Statehouse Report is published every Monday during the Legislative Session.

 

 Bill List

Click here for a list of bills that are or will be appearing before the Colorado General Assembly. 

This list will be updated weekly during the Legislative Session.

Position Papers

CML produces position papers on bills throughout the legislative session. Click here to view.

 

Legislative Priorities

 

Legislative Kickoff Webinar

Check out the recording of our Legislative Kickoff Webinar for information on CML's legislative priorities and session information.

 

Legislative Matters


Twice before, the General Assembly has considered legislation that purported to allow local governments (municipalities and counties) in Colorado the ability to set a minimum wage different than the state minimum wage. Each time, the legislation failed in a split legislature. In 2019, a different outcome is likely.

Read Legislative Matters

Legal

 

Spotlight Case


By Elizabeth LeBuhn, CML Law Clerk


Daily Camera Files Suit to Compel CU Boulder Board of Regents to Disclose Finalists in University Presidential Search

The Colorado Open Records Act (CORA) and Open Meetings Law (OML) require all public bodies in the state to announce the “finalists” when filling an “executive position.”  These laws typically apply to municipal governing bodies when hiring a city manager or town administrator.  A recent case arising out of the University of Colorado may affect how municipalities understand and apply these laws. 

Over one hundred applicants, twenty-eight search committee interviews, six Board of Regents interviews, but only one name—Mark Kennedy—released to the public: these are the numbers to which the Daily Camera points in filing its September 30 lawsuit to compel the University of Colorado to disclose names of five other finalists for the role of University President, in accordance with two CORA requests the Camera filed earlier this year. As reported by the Denver Post, the CU Board of Regents previously declined to release the names after receiving the Camera’s May and July CORA requests. The Post quoted a spokesperson for CU, who stated that naming a singular finalist has been the university’s “long-standing practice” and that the university’s position is that it has “long had the ability to name a sole finalist.”

As CORA and the OML are written, the list of finalists for a chief executive officer position of a state or local public body must be made public at least two weeks before an individual assumes the role. Additionally, if three or less candidates “possess the minimum qualifications for the position,” then those candidates will be considered “finalists” for purposes of records requests. While the CU Board of Regents interviewed six applicants in the final stages of the search process, it is their position that only one of these applicants is a “finalist” under the law, the last four CU Boulder presidents have been named in this way, and that CU has long believed it has the authority to name a sole finalist.

https://www.denverpost.com/2019/09/30/boulder-daily-camera-sues-cu-regents-mark-kennedy/

 

Amicus Update


By Elizabeth LeBuhn, CML Law Clerk


Daily Camera Files Suit to Compel CU Boulder Board of Regents to Disclose Finalists in University Presidential Search

The Colorado Open Records Act (CORA) and Open Meetings Law (OML) require all public bodies in the state to announce the “finalists” when filling an “executive position.”  These laws typically apply to municipal governing bodies when hiring a city manager or town administrator.  A recent case arising out of the University of Colorado may affect how municipalities understand and apply these laws. 

Over one hundred applicants, twenty-eight search committee interviews, six Board of Regents interviews, but only one name—Mark Kennedy—released to the public: these are the numbers to which the Daily Camera points in filing its September 30 lawsuit to compel the University of Colorado to disclose names of five other finalists for the role of University President, in accordance with two CORA requests the Camera filed earlier this year. As reported by the Denver Post, the CU Board of Regents previously declined to release the names after receiving the Camera’s May and July CORA requests. The Post quoted a spokesperson for CU, who stated that naming a singular finalist has been the university’s “long-standing practice” and that the university’s position is that it has “long had the ability to name a sole finalist.”

As CORA and the OML are written, the list of finalists for a chief executive officer position of a state or local public body must be made public at least two weeks before an individual assumes the role. Additionally, if three or less candidates “possess the minimum qualifications for the position,” then those candidates will be considered “finalists” for purposes of records requests. While the CU Board of Regents interviewed six applicants in the final stages of the search process, it is their position that only one of these applicants is a “finalist” under the law, the last four CU Boulder presidents have been named in this way, and that CU has long believed it has the authority to name a sole finalist.

https://www.denverpost.com/2019/09/30/boulder-daily-camera-sues-cu-regents-mark-kennedy/

 

New in the Courts


By Elizabeth LeBuhn, CML Law Clerk


Daily Camera Files Suit to Compel CU Boulder Board of Regents to Disclose Finalists in University Presidential Search

The Colorado Open Records Act (CORA) and Open Meetings Law (OML) require all public bodies in the state to announce the “finalists” when filling an “executive position.”  These laws typically apply to municipal governing bodies when hiring a city manager or town administrator.  A recent case arising out of the University of Colorado may affect how municipalities understand and apply these laws. 

Over one hundred applicants, twenty-eight search committee interviews, six Board of Regents interviews, but only one name—Mark Kennedy—released to the public: these are the numbers to which the Daily Camera points in filing its September 30 lawsuit to compel the University of Colorado to disclose names of five other finalists for the role of University President, in accordance with two CORA requests the Camera filed earlier this year. As reported by the Denver Post, the CU Board of Regents previously declined to release the names after receiving the Camera’s May and July CORA requests. The Post quoted a spokesperson for CU, who stated that naming a singular finalist has been the university’s “long-standing practice” and that the university’s position is that it has “long had the ability to name a sole finalist.”

As CORA and the OML are written, the list of finalists for a chief executive officer position of a state or local public body must be made public at least two weeks before an individual assumes the role. Additionally, if three or less candidates “possess the minimum qualifications for the position,” then those candidates will be considered “finalists” for purposes of records requests. While the CU Board of Regents interviewed six applicants in the final stages of the search process, it is their position that only one of these applicants is a “finalist” under the law, the last four CU Boulder presidents have been named in this way, and that CU has long believed it has the authority to name a sole finalist.

https://www.denverpost.com/2019/09/30/boulder-daily-camera-sues-cu-regents-mark-kennedy/

 

2019 Laws Enacted is Available

2019 Colorado Laws Enacted Affecting Municipal Governments

Each year, CML analyzes the laws passed by the Colorado General Assembly that affect cities and towns, and compiles that information into the publication, Colorado Laws Enacted Affecting Municipalities. The 2019 edition is now available; previous years also are available for free online.

Learn More